On Robert G. Ingersoll, Liberty, and the Jews

220px-Robert_G._Ingersoll_-_Brady-Handy

Robert G. Ingersoll photo from Wikipedia page

Most people who know me, know that I am a rabid individualist. Nearly every morning for the past 7 months or so I’ve posted a quote of the day through my twitter feed; sometimes it is retweeted, most of the time they are not. Obviously the short ones are more likely to be retweeted. Nevertheless, these quotes (not all I agree with, by the way) are shared because they make me think, and perhaps they will make others think as well – if only for the span of time it takes to glance through a tweet in someone’s feed.

Over the past few months I have found myself introduced in this manner to the writings of Robert G. Ingersoll (1833-1899), a writer of incredible talent that somehow I missed in my lessons of history. It appears that much of Mr. Ingersoll’s temperament and disposition – as well as his irritation to his contemporaries – mirror my own in a way. :) In other words, I found myself identifying with his biography.

Regardless, if you have a few more seconds than it takes to read through a tweet, I highly recommend two particular quotes from Ingersoll’s writings as they relate to Liberty (as a concept and practical matter).

The first is often abbreviated to just the last sentence, but I believe the context makes it even more powerful a statement.

It was not until the year 1808 that Great Britain abolished the slave trade. Up to that time her judges, sitting upon the bench in the name of justice, her priests, occupying her pulpits, in the name of universal love, owned stock in the slave ships, and luxuriated upon the profits of piracy and murder. It was not until the same year that the United States of America abolished the slave trade between this and other countries, but carefully preserved it as between the States. It was not until the 28th day of August, 1833, that Great Britain abolished human slavery in her colonies; and it was not until the 1st day of January, 1863, that Abraham Lincoln, sustained by the sublime and heroic North, rendered our flag pure as the sky in which it floats.

Abraham Lincoln was, in my judgment, in many respects, the grandest man ever President of the United States. Upon his monument these words should be written: ‘Here sleeps the only man in the history of the world, who, having been clothed with almost absolute power, never abused it, except upon the side of mercy.’

Think how long we clung to the institution of human slavery, how long lashes upon the naked back were a legal tender for labor performed. Think of it.

With every drop of my blood I hate and execrate every form of tyranny, every form of slavery. I hate dictation. I love liberty.

- The Liberty of Man, Woman and Child

The second, on his observations of the “God of the Hebrews,” is a take unlike any I’ve ever read – and believe me I’ve read a lot on this subject:

“When reading the history of the Jewish people, of their flight from slavery to death, of their exchange of tyrants, I must confess that my sympathies are all aroused in their behalf. They were cheated, deceived and abused.Their god was quick-tempered unreasonable, cruel, revengeful and dishonest. He was always promising but never performed. He wasted time in ceremony and childish detail, and in the exaggeration of what he had done.

It is impossible for me to conceive of a character more utterly detestable than that of the Hebrew god. He had solemnly promised the Jews that he would take them from Egypt to a land flowing with milk and honey. He had led them to believe that in a little while their troubles would be over, and that they would soon in the land of Canaan, surrounded by their wives and little ones, forget the stripes and tears of Egypt. After promising the poor wanderers again and again that he would lead them in safety to the promised land of joy and plenty, this God, forgetting every promise, said to the wretches in his power:—’Your carcasses shall fall in this wilderness and your children shall wander until your carcasses be wasted.’

This curse was the conclusion of the whole matter. Into this dust of death and night faded all the promises of God. Into this rottenness of wandering despair fell all the dreams of liberty and home. Millions of corpses were left to rot in the desert, and each one certified to the dishonesty of Jehovah. I cannot believe these things. They are so cruel and heartless, that my blood is chilled and my sense of justice shocked. A book that is equally abhorrent to my head and heart, cannot be accepted as a revelation from God.

When we think of the poor Jews, destroyed, murdered, bitten by serpents, visited by plagues, decimated by famine, butchered by each, other, swallowed by the earth, frightened, cursed, starved, deceived, robbed and outraged, how thankful we should be that we are not the chosen people of God. No wonder that they longed for the slavery of Egypt, and remembered with sorrow the unhappy day when they exchanged masters. Compared with Jehovah, Pharaoh was a benefactor, and the tyranny of Egypt was freedom to those who suffered the liberty of God.

While reading the Pentateuch, I am filled with indignation, pity and horror. Nothing can be sadder than the history of the starved and frightened wretches who wandered over the desolate crags and sands of wilderness and desert, the prey of famine, sword, and plague. Ignorant and superstitious to the last degree, governed by falsehood, plundered by hypocrisy, they were the sport of priests, and the food of fear. God was their greatest enemy, and death their only friend.

It is impossible to conceive of a more thoroughly despicable, hateful, and arrogant being, than the Jewish god. He is without a redeeming feature. In the mythology of the world he has no parallel. He, only, is never touched by agony and tears. He delights only in blood and pain. Human affections are naught to him. He cares neither for love nor music, beauty nor joy. A false friend, an unjust judge, a braggart, hypocrite, and tyrant, sincere in hatred, jealous, vain, and revengeful, false in promise, honest in curse, suspicious, ignorant, and changeable, infamous and hideous:—such is the God of the Pentateuch.

[...]

Not one word was said by Moses or Aaron as to the wickedness of depriving a human being of his liberty. Not a word was said in favor of liberty. Not the slightest intimation that a human being was justly entitled to the product of his own labor. Not a word about the cruelty of masters who would destroy even the babes of slave mothers. It seems to me wonderful that this God did not tell the king of Egypt that no nation could enslave another, without also enslaving itself; that it was impossible to put a chain around the limbs of a slave, without putting manacles upon the brain of the master. Why did he not tell him that a nation founded upon slavery could not stand?

Instead of declaring these things, instead of appealing to justice, to mercy and to liberty, he resorted to feats of jugglery. Suppose we wished to make a treaty with a barbarous nation, and the president should employ a sleight-of-hand performer as envoy extraordinary, and instruct him, that when he came into the presence of the savage monarch, he should cast down an umbrella or a walking stick, which would change into a lizard or a turtle; what would we think? Would we not regard such a performance as beneath the dignity even of a president? And what would be our feelings if the savage king sent for his sorcerers and had them perform the same feat? If such things would appear puerile and foolish in the president of a great republic, what shall be said when they were resorted to by the creator of all worlds?

How small, how contemptible such a God appears!”

- Some Mistakes of Moses

I confess that while reading the Pentateuch myself I had similar feelings as Ingersoll, but thought there must have been something wrong with me because no one else seemed to have similar perspectives. I wish I had had the ability to express my concerns at the time as clearly as he did.

Bandwidth, Latency and Throughput, the Star Trek Way

June 26, 2014 2 comments

Okay, I know there are a lot of different explanations about how to describe these common components of networks (see, for instance, here, here, here, here, and here), but every once in a while I get a question about whether or not 40G will make things go “faster” in networks (often relating to FCoE and storage in general). Why write another one? I wanted to see how fast I could make this easy to understand.

Last night as I was trying to wind down to go to sleep, I had a brainstorm about an interesting visual (to me, at least) that might help explain some of the different concepts in moving data around. Your mileage may vary. Read more…

You Do Good Work

June 23, 2014 3 comments

keep-calm-and-keep-up-the-good-workThere is something I’ve been struggling with lately, trying to deal with some major issues of the pressure that comes naturally to a workaholic in high-stress environments. You may have been too; in fact a friend of yours may have sent you a link to this blog for one very important reason that you may have missed somewhere along the way:

You do good work. Read more…

Categories: Philosophy Tags: ,

Quick Take: Why Not the User-Defined Data Center?

Are you pondering what I'm pondering?

Are you pondering what I’m pondering?

I’ve been struggling with names (or rather, the act of naming) recently. As I get more and more involved into the aspect of Data Centers and Programmability, trying to become more familiar in a world that remains considerably alien to me, I begin to struggle with some of the rather buzzword-laden (but ultimately vague) nomenclature:

  • Software-Defined Networks
  • Software-Defined Storage
  • Software-Defined Data Center

Yet, when you break down what each of these things mean, you start to realize that they become rather limited in what can actually be deployed. “Everything in software,” “Hardware means nothing,” “You need both hardware and software,” etc. Doesn’t this sideshow actually distract us from what we’re really trying to do?

thought we were simply trying to make deployments easier and more flexible. We keep hearing about “lock-in,” but what it really means is that we don’t want to be locked into our own decisions. In other words, we want to change our minds, adapt as necessary, and not have to build a whole new Data Center just because our technological crystal ball during the financial crises of 2008 and 2009 forced us to make choices that we now make us feel trapped.

What’s wrong with just a “User-Defined Data Center?” I mean, I’ve always been a huge proponent of using the right tools for the job, but why swap out one limitation (hardware-based) for another (software-based)? If I’m a Data Center user, don’t I just want it to work the way I want it to? After all, that’s what all this hype is supposed to be, anyway. It’s my equipment, my applications, I want to define it.

It seems to me that all this stuff about “software-defined” still wants to withhold the actual decision-making power from the user and keep it in the hands of those who create the software, rather than any real liberation from “lock-in,” which much of the marketing hype wants you to believe.

Just a quick take about nomenclature, nothing more. We now return you…

Categories: Uncategorized

OpenStack and Storage, a Response

May 29, 2014 3 comments
No Fibre Channel allowed?

No Fibre Channel allowed?

During the recent OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, GA, I wrote a blog on the Cisco blog site called “Thoughts on #OpenStack and Software-Defined Storage,” arguing for the need to avoid reinventing the wheel when it comes to Software-Defined X and storage. My very good friend Stephen Foskett wrote a (fair and excellent) response, entitled Why OpenStack Doesn’t Need Fibre Channel Support.

Stephen’s argument, essentially, is that Fibre Channel, and the conventional IT that it represents, do not really have a place in the Open systems, such as the OpenStack ecosystem. Thing is, I think Stephen’s argument is a little too late. The cat has left the barn, and the genie has been let out of the toothpaste tube, the train has left the gate. Or something to that effect. Read more…

Willys Jeep: Axle and Frame Reassembly

For much of this project there has been a lot of “one step forward, two steps back,” especially when it comes to things like brakes and suspension for Porkchop. My exasperation was mitigated a bit, however, when I made some excellent progress within a two weeks time with the help of my wife and a friend. In the short video below (no audio), you’ll see as we carefully reassembled the axles to the wheels, and then the axle assembly to Badger’s frame.

All in all, progress is a very satisfying motivation. As usual, there are before/after shots too.

Willys Jeep: Quick and Dirty Axle Before-and-After

 

4002fae2e65d57bdc33cf21c97631e69_largeI don’t have a lot of time, so this is going to be a pure photo extravaganza. Just brought the Badger’s axles back from the restorers. Due to time constraints I haven’t even had the chance to take them off the trailer yet. I’ll write more about that later. For now, though, here are the comparisons for the axles after they’ve been restored, powder-coated. This is only the rear axle, but I’ll take pictures of the front soon. Read more…

Categories: Jeep Tags: , , ,
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